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Archive for the ‘Poets: Past & Present’ Category

We have not wings, we cannot soar;
But we have feet to scale and climb
By slow degrees, by more and more,
The cloudy summits of our time

The mighty pyramids of stone
That wedge-like cleave the desert airs,

English: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, circa 1850.

English: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, circa 1850. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When nearer seen, and better known,
Are but gigantic flights of stairs.

The distant mountains, that uprear
Their solid bastions to the skies,
Are crossed by pathways, that appear
As we to higher levels rise.

The heights by great men reached and kept
Were not attained by sudden flight,
But they, while their companions slept,
Were toiling upward in the night.
 

    By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

 

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Open Flower

Open Flower (Photo credit: Irwin-Scott)

They cannot shell His temple
Nor dynamite His throne;
They cannot bomb His city,
Nor rob Him of His own.
They cannot take Him captive,
Nor strike Him deaf and blind.
Nor starve Him to surrender,
Nor make Him change His mind.
They cannot cause Him panic,
Nor cut off His supplies,
They cannot take His kingdom,
Nor hurt Him with their lies.
Though all the world be shattered
His truth remains the same,
His righteous laws still potent
And “Father” still His name.
Though we face war and struggle,
And feel their goad and rod,
We know above confusion
There always will be God.

-A Murray

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John Donne, one of the most famous Metaphysica...

John Donne, one of the most famous Metaphysical Poets.

COME live with me, and be my love,
And we will some new pleasures prove
Of golden sands, and crystal brooks,
With silken lines and silver hooks.

There will the river whisp’ring run
Warm’d by thy eyes, more than the sun ;
And there th’ enamour’d fish will stay,
Begging themselves they may betray.

When thou wilt swim in that live bath,
Each fish, which every channel hath,
Will amorously to thee swim,
Gladder to catch thee, than thou him.

If thou, to be so seen, be’st loth,
By sun or moon, thou dark’nest both,
And if myself have leave to see,
I need not their light, having thee.

Let others freeze with angling reeds,
And cut their legs with shells and weeds,
Or treacherously poor fish beset,
With strangling snare, or windowy net.

Let coarse bold hands from slimy nest
The bedded fish in banks out-wrest ;
Or curious traitors, sleeve-silk flies,
Bewitch poor fishes’ wand’ring eyes.

For thee, thou need’st no such deceit,
For thou thyself art thine own bait :
That fish, that is not catch’d thereby,
Alas ! is wiser far than I.

 

By John Donne

 

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Nature

English: Portrait of William Wordsworth by Wil...

English: Portrait of William Wordsworth

“Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher” by William Wordsworth.

Nature’s heart is beautiful, see how she unfolds at the gentle bidding  of the sun.

She is compassionate too, and even full of fun.

She calls to you today to be  in agreement

For she waits patiently still, because you’re needed in the final act of denouement.

By Joszann St.John

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Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee
.

by William Shakespeare.

Arguably the greatest love poem ever written.

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Thought provoking!Timeless work.

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The Moon

The moon has a face like the clock in the hall;
She shines on thieves on the garden wall,
On streets and fields and harbour quays,
And birdies asleep in the forks of the trees.

The squalling cat and the squeaking mouse,
The howling dog by the door of the house,
The bat that lies in bed at noon,
All love to be out by the light of the moon.

But all of the things that belong to the day
Cuddle to sleep to be out of her way;
And flowers and children close their eyes
Till up in the morning the sun shall arise.

by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Still one of my favorites.

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